Welcome!

I reunite identified family photos that I find in antique shops and second hand stores with genealogists and family historians. If you see one of your ancestors here and would like to obtain the original, feel free to contact me at familyphotoreunion [ at ] yahoo [ dot ] com. I also accept donations of pre-1927 images to be reunited. I hope you enjoy your visit!
~The Archivist


Tuesday, October 23, 2018

The Horn Album, Umatilla County, Oregon: A Genealogist's Dream


I purchased this family photograph album at the Seattle Antiquarian Bookshow last week, along with way too many books. The album contains three carte de visite photographs and nine tintypes, all identified, but undated. The album is inscribed “My Father’s album presented to Mr. & Mrs. William K. Backstrom [?] by Miss Lenora V. Horn.” Most of the people in the album have early connections to Umatilla County, Oregon. Only one of the photos displays a photographer’s imprint, and unfortunately, the information I found on the photographer was minimal, and didn't help to narrow down the date of the photo any further than I had already estimated. Most of the photographs seem to be taken in the 1870s or early 1880s.

Inside album - Left: inscription, Right: Charley Powers
Inscription - inside front cover
Inscription - inside back cover 
Subjects featured in this album are:

1) Charley Powers – cdv photograph
2) George Horn – tintype photograph
3) Calvin Wallace – cdv
4) Miss Ada Walton – tintype
5) Will Looney – tintype
6) Annie Sappingfield -cdv circa
7) William Sappingfield – tintype (tinted)
8) John W. Horn & Arthur Noble - tintype
9) George Horn & John W. Horn - tintype
10) George Horn & Abrigail [Abigail] Horn – tintype
11) Angeline Doty now Angeline Minich – tintype (tinted), taken at the F.A. Smith Studio in Salem.
12) Misas [Misses] Ingram – tintype (tinted)

John William Horn (b. 1858) and George Washington Horn (b. 1857-1931) were brothers, both born in Oregon to Adam Wise Horn and Elizabeth McClure Looney (b. abt 1840)1,2. John W. seems to be the original owner of the album and his daughter, Lenora V. Horn inscribed the above mentioned notation. Susan Anna Ritchey was John’s second wife and Lenora’s mother.3,5 John’s brother, George, married Abigail Simmons4.

An obituary in the Portland Morning Oregonian provides a great deal of genealogical information about William Sappingfield (b.1830) and his origins6. It also provides a photograph to compare with the identified photograph in the album, and I am certain he is our man. In 1866, William Sappingfield married sixteen-year-old Frances W. Looney in Marion, Oregon7. As for the “Annie Sappingfield” in the album, I haven’t been able to find a possible match for her. I have an inkling it might be Frances, because the photo inscription was written overtop an erasure, and it looks like the given (erased) name began with an F. It could be a case of misidentification.

Elizabeth Looney (b. abt 1840) and Frances W. Looney (b. abt 1850) were both daughters of William Looney (b. abt 1818) and Elmira McClure.8,9 Their father, William, drowned on 15 Aug 1850 at age 33, as he tried to cross the Santiam River, near Hale’s Ferry.10,11 His widow, Elmira, married Nelson Ransome Doty about a year later12. Angeline Doty was born to Nelson and Elmira in 185713. Angeline married Jacob P. Minch in 1882. The William Looney featured in the album is a bit of a puzzle. The image can’t be William Looney, father to Elizabeth and Frances, because it likely dates to the 1870s.

I believe the Charley Powers in the album is Charles E. Powers (b. 10 Sept 1853) who married Emma Wallace in 187614. Emma’s brother was James Calvin Wallace (b. abt 1856), and he is also featured in this album15.

Arthur Noble, who posed with John Horn in image #8, is probably Arthur B. Noble, (b. 1855) husband of Alta Horn, sister of George and John W. Horn.16

I’m unsure how Miss Ada Walton is connected to John William Horn. I did find information on Ancestry databases pertaining to an Ada Ossie Walton (b. abt 1867), daughter of Lane County Judge, Joshua Jones Walton and his wife, Rebecca Gale. Ada was a school teacher in Oregon from 1882-1902, and later worked in Seattle as a stenographer/bookkeeper.17

If you can elaborate on any of these people, I hope you’ll leave a comment below.

Left: Annie Sappingfield  Right: William Sappingfield




1 "United States Census, 1860", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MDQJ-V4B : 13 December 2017), Jno W Horn in entry for A Horn, 1860.
2 "United States Census, 1870," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MF8B-MYH : 12 April 2016), John Horn in household of A W Horn, Oregon, United States; citing p. 1, family 1, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,785.
3 "United States Census, 1930," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XCSD-J9S : accessed 18 October 2018), John W Horn, Pendleton, Umatilla, Oregon, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 55, sheet 16B, line 54, family 160, NARA microfilm publication T626 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2002), roll 1956; FHL microfilm 2,341,690
4 Ancestry.com. Oregon, Early Oregonians Index, 1800-1860 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014, entry for George Washington Horn, citing Early Oregonians Database Index. Oregon State Archives, Salem, Oregon. (https://secure.sos.state.or.us/prs/profile.do?recordNumber= 66615)
5 Ancestry.com. Oregon, Early Oregonians Index, 1800-1860 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014, entry for John William Horn, citing Early Oregonians Database Index. Oregon State Archives, Salem, Oregon. (https://secure.sos.state.or.us/prs/profile.do?ancRecordNumber= 66617)
6 “Man Who Crosses Plains to Oregon in 1847 Dies in Goldendale,” The Morning Oregonian, Portland, Oregon, 3 August 1911, p. 6. Image provided by University of Oregon Libraries; Eugene, OR (http://www.oregonnews.uoregon.edu).
7 Ancestry.com. Marion County, Oregon, Marriage Records, 1849-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012; entry for William Sappingfield; citing Custer, Jeanne, and Daraleen Wade, compilers. The Marriage Records of Marion County, Oregon, Volume 1, 1849–1871. Salem, Oregon: Willamette Valley Genealogical Society, 1979.
8 Ancestry.com. Oregon, Early Oregonians Index, 1800-1860 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014, entry for Elizabeth McClure Looney, citing Early Oregonians Database Index. Oregon State Archives, Salem, Oregon. (https://secure.sos.state.or.us/prs/profile.do?recordNumber=27602
9 Ancestry.com. Oregon, Early Oregonians Index, 1800-1860 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014, entry for Frances William Looney, citing Early Oregonians Database Index. Oregon State Archives, Salem, Oregon. (https://secure.sos.state.or.us/prs/profile.do?recordNumber= 71668 (https://secure.sos.state.or.us/prs/profile.do?recordNumber=27602
10 “Casualties [death of William Looney],” Oregon Spectator, Oregon City, Oregon, 5 September 1850., p. 2. Image provided by University of Oregon Libraries; Eugene, OR (http://www.oregonnews.uoregon.edu
11 Ancestry.com. Willamette Valley, Oregon, Death Records, 1838-2006 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012, entry for William Looney, citing Death, Burial, and Obituary Collection. Salem, Oregon: Willamette Valley Genealogical Society, accessed 18 Oct 2018.
12 Ancestry.com. Oregon, Early Oregonians Index, 1800-1860 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014, entry for Elmira McClure, citing Early Oregonians Database Index. Oregon State Archives, Salem, Oregon. (https://secure.sos.state.or.us/prs/profile.do?recordNumber=29990)
13 Ancestry.com. Oregon, Early Oregonians Index, 1800-1860 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014, entry for Angeline Doty, citing Early Oregonians Database Index. Oregon State Archives, Salem, Oregon. (https://secure.sos.state.or.us/prs/profile.do?ancRecordNumber=19995)
14 Ancestry.com. Oregon, Early Oregonians Index, 1800-1860 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014, entry for Charles E. Powers, citing Early Oregonians Database Index. Oregon State Archives, Salem, Oregon. (https://secure.sos.state.or.us/prs/profile.do?ancRecordNumber= 60838
15 Ancestry.com. Oregon, Early Oregonians Index, 1800-1860 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014, entry for James Calvin Wallace, citing Early Oregonians Database Index. Oregon State Archives, Salem, Oregon. (https://secure.sos.state.or.us/prs/profile.do?ancRecordNumber= 25198)
16 Ancestry.com. Oregon, Early Oregonians Index, 1800-1860 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014, entry for Arthur B. Noble, citing Early Oregonians Database Index. Oregon State Archives, Salem, Oregon. (https://secure.sos.state.or.us/prs/profile.do?ancRecordNumber= 14186)
17 General Register of the Officers and Alumni 1873-1907. Eugene, Or.: The University, 1908. Print.

Monday, August 27, 2018

The Irascible Mr. Pip and His Human Family, Cheltenham, England, 1900s?



I don't normally feature unidentified family portraits here on the blog, but I just couldn't resist this one. Even though the nameless humans in the image are pretty much overshadowed in every way by the huge personality of the four-legged character sitting atop the wooden table, I felt there still might be an interesting story to dig up from the clues in this portrait.

He may not really be irascible and "Mr. Pip" is probably not his real name, but I felt "dog" just wasn't a colourful enough moniker, so "Mr. Pip" he will be. I suspect he didn't think too highly of the photographer. The firm hold his owners have on him might indicate that Mr. Pip has already tried to launch off of the table to let the photographer know what he thinks of this posing business and his infernal photographic equipment.

W. C. Fields famously advised, "Never work with animals or children," but it seems J.  Holloway worked with both during his years as a photographer, judging from the advertisement he placed in the Glouchester News on 28 May 1887, where he states that "animals and children [are] a specialty." The website Sussex Photo History has already researched the work of Jesse Holloway quite thoroughly and if you would like to know more about his work, family and studio, you will benefit from visiting their site by clicking on the link above.

But now we're left with two major mysteries:

1) Who are the individuals in the photograph?
2) Who actually photographed this image?

Even though the photographer's imprint says "J. Holloway, Cheltenham," I don't know for sure that Jesse Holloway was actually the photographer. According to Sussex Photo History, Jesse Holloway died in 1896, and his wife, Caroline Holloway took over the business. Then, in 1902, the Holloways' daughter, Edith, became proprietor of the studio. But, according to the 1901 England Census for Cheltenham, every member of the Holloway household was a worker in the family photography business: Caroline (the mother), Annie, Elizabeth, Kate, Wilfred, and Bertha1.

I think it's a good possibility that Mrs. Holloway and her family continued to use the J. Holloway imprint after his death. I could not locate a single Holloway Studio photograph that carried any name other than "J. Holloway" after 1896. That doesn't mean they don't exist, just that I haven't found them. I also noticed that Caroline Holloway continued to use Jesse's name in the Gloucester county directories after his death, as she did in the 1902 entry2:

Holloway Jesse (Mrs.), photographer, 32 Cambray

If I were to date the image, based on clothing, hairstyle and photograph format, I would make a liberal guess it was taken around 1900-1912, leaning towards 1904-05, but I'm certainly not committed to that. Dating this one is tricky. Just when I think I have a date narrowed down, I notice some other aspect of dress or fashion that suggests an earlier or later dating. We can't see the women's skirts or the cut of the man's suit and there is very little in the way of jewellery or fashion accessories to consider. The women's hairstyles seem to be in line with the late Victorian "frizzy" period. Another indication of date is the man's high imperial collar, which was popular in the 1890s to about 1905. One of the women is wearing a fob-watch pinned to her blouse, which was popular in the Edwardian period, but fell out of favour by the end of the World War I.

Mystery #1 seems to be unsolvable at the moment, so onto Mystery #2.

How would you date this image and who, exactly, is Mr. Pip staring down?



1 “1901 England Census,” database, Ancestry.ca (http://www.ancestry.ca : accessed 16 Aug 2018), entry for Caroline Holloway (age 59), citing PRO RG13; Piece: 2464; Folio: 88; Page: 12; Cheltenham registration district, Cheltenham subdistrict, ED 37, schedule line number 38, GSU roll: 1341277.
2 "U.K, City and County Directories, 1766-1946", indexed database and digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 Aug 2018), page 93, Jesse Holloway (Mrs.) entry; citing "Kelly’s Directory of the County of Gloucester, 1902 (London, Ill.:n.p., 1902)."

Monday, August 20, 2018

Revisiting the McCandlish House Postcard, Victoria, BC

Five years ago I wrote a post about a real photo postcard, written and sent by Emma McCandlish, a Victoria boarding house owner, with an image of her home on the front. In the post, I wondered if the buildings behind Emma's house at 63 Superior were BC's Parliament Buildings. Street numbering changed in Victoria in 1907, and I suspect 63 Superior may have become 534 Superior. Recently, I found this obituary in the Vancouver Daily World from the 25th of May 1921, which suggests that McCandlish's former home "at the rear of the Parliament Buildings" had been purchased by the provincial government.

I was in Victoria en route to San Francisco week before last and stopped by Munro's Books. There, I discovered a new-to-me print resource, This Old House: Victoria's Heritage Neighbourhoods by the Victoria Heritage Foundation for the City of Victoria. This four volume set, arranged by Victoria neighbourhoods, is an invaluable and informative resource that details historic homes in BC's capital city. I didn't have much time to browse through all of  the volumes, but I did locate an image and brief history of Emma McCandlish's last home at 422 Menzies, a house which was moved from another location to Menzies Street in July of 1910.



More research will have to be done to confirm that the home at 63/534 Superior was demolished and absorbed by the Parliament grounds. I was also curious about Emma's comment on the postcard that there had been some "severe weather" in Victoria around the time of her correspondence to Mrs. Harlock. I had a cursory look through the Daily Colonist newspaper for a couple days before and after the 20th of January, but didn't find any mention of unusually bad weather.

It's amazing how one postcard can generate so many questions and research possibilities!


Here's the original post from November 16, 2013:


First off, today's a good day to celebrate.  Family Photo Reunion has been in existence for one full year now.  I wasn't sure I could make it to November 16th,  through what has proven to be a very busy year, but here we are!

Our post today revolves around this real postcard from Victoria, BC.  It was written by Emma McCandlish, and addressed to Mrs. W. Harlock at 181 Fort Street, Victoria.  Emma McCandlish ran a boarding house in Victoria in 1892 at 63 Superior.  She was still at this property in 1906.  While I didn't have access to the 1907 BC Directory, I did find Emma in the directory for the following year at 534 Superior.

I had a little cyber-walk down Superior Street, thanks to Google Maps today, and I couldn't find a house similar to this one.  If this is, indeed, a picture of her own home, I have a feeling that house is long gone.  Do you see that stately building off in the distance on the left hand side of the image?  I'm wondering if it might be one of the Parliament buildings.

The BC Archives has a collection of correspondence once belonging to Emma McCandlish.  I think it would be fun to have a look the next time I'm down in Victoria.

If you'd like to get a sense of what Victoria was like in 1907, I found a great little video on Youtube.  Emma McCandlish would have been very familiar with these sights.  Who knows, she might even be in the film somewhere.  Enjoy!





Sunday, August 12, 2018

William Loring Clark's Grand House and Grounds in Dorchester, MA, 1867


I was in San Francisco last week, browsing bookstores and visiting the California Historical Society Library and Archives. This photograph was found in a box of ephemera at John Windle's Antiquarian Bookstore located on Geary Street. I was intrigued because I don't often find outdoor images from this time period. If the inscription on the back of the photograph is accurate, the picture dates to 1867, just two years after the end of the American Civil War. The woman standing on the front porch is wearing a dress very much in line with what I would expect from that time period. Rachel, the bookseller at John Windle, kindly gave me this photograph and I took it back home to Vancouver Island to see what I could do with it, in terms of identification.

On the reverse:


"Home of Wm Loring Clark Ashmont & Adams of Dorchester
taken spring of 1867
Mrs. Clark W.T.C. Ruth & Webster in carriage Annie Harmon standing
5 acres of grounds."

Sometimes an inscription such as this can be read a number of ways, especially when punctuation is absent. At first glance it looked as if the homeowner's name might be William Loring Clark Ashmont. But that didn't seem right. I thought a good starting point would be to figure out which Dorchester we were dealing with. I learned that Ashmont & Adams are intersecting streets in Dorchester, Massachusetts, and so that is where I began the search.

In 1865, William L. Clark, a thirty-eight year old auditor with the Rutland Railroad, lived in Boston with his wife, Ann and three children: William T., 14; Ruth M., 4; and one-month-old Webster1. This seemed like a close match with the individuals mentioned on the back of the photograph, but I was a little concerned that this family resided in Boston's Ward 11 rather than Dorchester, a community  located just outside of Boston. A check of the Dorchester City Directory for 1868 shows that Wm. L. Clark, a merchant, had a house on Adams near Ashmont in Dorchester, in addition to a location in Boston, at 105 Summer Street2

Information about the family after 1870 was difficult to locate. I was able to trace the children, as grown-ups, living in the San Francisco area, but I was unsuccessful locating them in the 1880 US Federal Census. I learned why after finding two death notices for W. L. Clark, one in the Boston Herald on December 25, 1887, which was published about eight months after his death. News must have travelled slowly from San Francisco to Boston in the 1880s. A more timely notice appeared in the San Diego Union3:

San Diego Union, 20 April 1886

The family appears to have moved from Massachusetts to Japan for a period of twelve years, resettling in the Bay area on their return to the United States around 1883. This explains how the image ended up in San Francisco.

As of yet, I haven't figured out how Annie Harmon connects up with this family. 



1 "Massachusetts State Census, 1865", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MQCP-C94 : 1 June 2018), William L Clark, 1865.
2 "U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995", indexed database and digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 Aug 2018), page 46, Wm. L. Clark entry; citing "Dorchester, Massachusetts, City Directory, 1868 (Boston, Ill.:n.p., 1968)."
3 San Diego Union (San Diego, CA) 20 April 1886, page 3 GenealogyBank https://www.genealogybank.com/doc/newspapers/image/v2%3A136E6A0F0DF56B38%40GB3NEWS-13ECFCA5670509CD%402410017-13ECEEA4B9D4EBC4%402-13ECEEA4B9D4EBC4%40 : accessed 10 August 2018